All posts filed under: Projects

From the Visible to the Tangible : Unseen Art

Imagine you wouldn’t be able to read what I’m writing right now. Unable to see what I’m seeing before me. Head to a museum or art gallery and not being able to marvel at this famous painting, this striking photograph, this stunning sculpture and sense the same excitement for the artist’s spark of ingenuity. The need to rely on other people’s description, perception and appreciation for an artwork rather than connecting the dots yourself. For some of us this might be hard to grasp, but for others this is just daily routine. Marc Dillon tries to change that, at least temporarily. His project Unseen Art strives to give blind and visually impaired people a chance to enjoy, experience and interact with art in a different way. Similar to Didu, an exciting new relief printing technique by Spanish designers Estudios Durero that adds palpable layers to paintings and photographs, the Finnish software programmer turns the visible into the tangible and recreates old and new masterpieces in 3D. He is currently raising funds to kickstart Unseen Art as a global …

Wrap up time: #100DaysOfTales

So yeah, I did it! Last friday, well, 3 days behind the big schedule, I launched my final photo story on instagram. Time to wrap up & look back on the crazy amazing journey that left me inspired, exhausted and above all proud. Weeks earlier I decided to be part of a movement, a self-experiment, a challenge to see if I’d keep up or quit the whole thing. For #100DaysOfTales I captured 100 moments, big and small, meaningful and abstract, and brought them to life in 100 stories. Some were fictional stories that just felt right in the visual context, some were drawn from memories and experiences, some served as an emotional release, some actually happened right in front of me, while others were just mere thoughts and ideas that popped up and I tried to bring into a narrative order. Sounds easy peasy, but it was a struggle sometimes. There were days when I had no creativity at all, story-wise and visually. Then there were days when my brain was brimming over with ideas and had 2, 3, 4 things ready in my head, just no photo to go along with. …

Sweeney's Bothy #1 © The Bothy Project

The Artist and the Solitude: The Bothy Project

‘I am not an artist, but can I just live here, please?’ That was probably my first disbelieving thought, when I saw the beautiful images of these remote huts scattered around a pristine landscape. You could easily sneak them into collections of architecture appreciators like #cabinporn without revealing their true purpose – besides looking outrageously cosy. The Bothy Project, initiated by artist Bobby Niven and architect Iain MacLeod in 2011, is a network of intimate, small-scale and off-grid art residency spaces in distinct locations around Scotland and beyond. While offering a platform for artists from various disciplines and practices to journey and explore the peculiarities of the history, mythology, landscape and people in the areas surrounding the bothies, the team behind TBP is committed to use only sustainable, innovative materials to create simple, modern designs. So far, there’s three lovely bothies to marvel at: Inshriach Bothy was built as a part of RSA Residencies for Scotland and fabricated in residence at the Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop in 2011, before getting nestled in a sparse hilltop wood …

The Pigeon Plan

We’ve seen wonderful charitable projects that had quite an impact on the lives of kids in areas shattered by war, natural catastrophes and social marginalisation by threading new, alternative paths. While ambitious ventures such as ‘Skateistan‘ are mostly supported by newly created organisations, generous sponsors, widespread media coverage (inside and outside of the mainstream) and hundreds of helping hands, a small project initiated by the collective around professional skateboarders Louis Taubert, Kerem Elvers and Lucas Fiederling takes a similar line, though with entirely different DIY resources and aspirations. The idea behind ‘The Pigeon Plan’ originates from a number of trips down to South Africa in the last few years, which left them saddened by the massive gap between the rich and poor in the country. While most newly erected skateparks in South Africa have a pretty good standard, many kids from underprivileged backgrounds can’t afford to use them without the necessary equipment at hand. That’s how the initiative comes into play: Over the last few months, 100 once-loved boards have been donated, collected and equipped …

© LLSB

Let the Good Times Roll: ‘Long Live South Bank’

Growing up in an urbanized region of Germany, I eventually started skateboarding with a few friends in the early-2000’s. Magazines and skate videos allowed us to think out of the box, although media has been very focused on what was happening in the US-‘motherland’. Every now and then, a rad concrete skate spot in London appeared on a magazine’s photo or in a split-second video sequence: The ‘Undercroft’. From my callow continental perspective, it was the spot of the capital. Quite so! Soon after local skateboarders adopted the spot at the forefront of the Thames for their own means in the mid-70s, the foremost neglected ‘Undercroft’ evolved as an iconic part of London’s Southbank. Gradually, the secret birthplace of British skateboarding grew organically and generated a lively scene of like-minded. Apart from skateboarders, the concrete spot attracted generations of BMXers, photographers, directors and graffiti artists throughout its almost 40 years of existence. The Undercroft has become a symbol of a vivid cultural heritage for young people, for creative minds as well as an attraction for those, who …