All posts tagged: superheroes

Behind the Mask: Sandra Chevrier’s ‘Cage’ series

Honesty and authenticity are significant features I hold dear in people whom I am sharing intimate moments of joy and sorrow with: No make-up, no cheesy smiles, no false sympathy, no façades, just being your true self. That may be the case with our closest friends and families, who bravely tolerate even our greatest flaws and weaknesses. Outside of this sheltered entity, the world yet seems to be quite a different one. Whether it’s in front of our boss, co-workers or even team-mates, we often play a role defined by the irrevocable values of society and thus – intentional or unintentional – living a life behind a mask every now and then. Empathizing with the female perspective, the French-Canadian artist, illustrator and painter Sandra Chevrier visualises our ‘twisted preconceptions of what a woman should or shouldn’t be’ and their constant struggle to escape these prisons of identity. Brilliantly merging fine art with pop and street art styles, her Marvel & DC symbolism-infused ‘cage’-series illustrates society’s utopian expectation for pure beauty and perfection, asking the women …

Hey Studio’s ‘Oh my God’ @ Kemistry Gallery

Other than comic book superheroes like Superman, Batman or Thor, the ancient gods of Greek mythology have nearly vanished from our present-day cultural consciousness. Nonetheless, the Spanish design collective ‘Hey Studio’ playfully tries to reinstate the old order of Zeus, Heracles or Hades with its most recent series ‘Oh my God’ at Kemistry Gallery: “In ancient Greece they had something better than superheroes. They had gods – each with their own powers, weaknesses, history and followers. Jupiter and Mars came, Jesus and Mohammed, Buddha and Elvis. 2,500 years later, they return to claim their place and remind us that there is nothing more dangerous than believed immortality.” However, the legendary characters and creatures of ancient scholarly books are not unleashed in their dusty, cryptic and impalpable form of Homer’s or Dante’s narrative, but approach the observer with a slightly updated, simplistic comic-style, sparkling with cheekiness. Welcome to Mt. Olympus 2.0! True, compared to the images of the flashy Clark Kent, the gadget-lover Bruce Wayne or the hammer-swinging son of Odin, our exhibited Greek gods appear rather innocent, tame and somewhat cute. Well, …