All posts tagged: London

Laura Pannack: Separation

Brexit’s a tough topic, a sore spot, especially if you’re experiencing it in the midst of it all, have family and friends who are or will be affected by the aftermath that nobody fully understands, least the country’s politicians. A lot, maybe too much has been said, written, lied, complained and argued about it, yet it’s an issue that’s in a way affecting everyone in Europe. And may it only tell us about the state the European project is in and how people perceive it, struggle with it, give up on it. Having lived in the UK before and after the horrendous decision as an expat myself before moving back to home soil, I know of the lingering questions that have put many relationships to the test. Shall we stay or do we have to leave? Does anyone still want us here? Should we get married to be on the safe side? In her intimate portrait series ‘Separation’, commissioned by British Journal of Photography, photographer Laura Pannack explores these feelings of uncertainty between London-based couples …

Ønwards

When I left London for Edinburgh a few years prior, everyone kept saying: “Look, you’re moving somewhere affordable, a place with charm, character and soul.” Of course, then I did not believe I was in for such a wonderful treat. In the last couple of months the reaction has been quite a similar one. An “Oh Berlin. I envy you” here, an “Berlin? Now, I’m jealous” there. Today, sitting in my new, rather empty apartment, between boxes piling up to the heavens, patiently waiting to be unpacked, it all feels a little strange to be here. A good kind of strange, I have to say. Pretty much six years ago to this day, I first set foot on an island that was foreign, yet took me in with open arms. A place brimming with life, a place I gladly called home shortly after, made the best friends, built relationships and with every passing day I wasn’t sure what to think about going back to the familiar home shores. Now after a heartfelt jump into the …

Mapping the Self: Patrice Barnabé

Whilst the art of self-portraiture, irrespective of creative discipline, has been often perceived as the magical door leading to the artist’s soul, it captures only a limited segment of a person’s life with all its emotions, experiences and mysteries. Patrice Barnabé is a London-based French Rioplatense graphic designer, who tries to approach the task from a slightly different perspective. With his elaborate use of typography, illustration and mapping, he tries to challenge and redefine the traditional format of the self-portrait on an extensive scale: ‘Geography and maps gather a lot of information and identity in a very condensed infographic. By picturing myself as an island, I managed to tell a lot about myself, show my favourite places on earth —some imaginary as well— and have some fun doing it.’ Find more of Patrice’s artworks & say Hi on social media: Patrice Barnabé @Twitter

Short Film Gem: Mind The Gap

There’s these days when I dearly miss London & all the things I left behind. One of them is taking the Tube every day of the week. The noise, the strange anonymity, the familiar faces, the colourfulness and yeah, even the musty smell, unbearable heat and brutal density. Loss is also a fitting term for Luke Flanagan‘s lovely short film that was shown at London Short Film Festival earlier this year & captures Tube melancholy from a moving and saddening angle. ‘Mind the Gap’ tells the story of Oswald Lawrence, stage actor and announcer of the iconic three words and his widow who would visit the tube years after his death to listen to his voice. Heartbreaking & beautiful. Superb work!

Navigating the world through graphic abstraction: David Lemm

His eye-catching artworks have been on top of my list for a while. Experimenting with form, composition and texture to weave complex narratives, David Lemm’s graphic works explores human assumptions of truth based on abstract, symbolic representations of reality. And after collaborating with the likes of Leith Late, the Hidden Door Festival or the Bothy Project, a little bird has told me that the Edinburgh-based creative has been selected as  House of Illustration’s latest resident artist! Due time to reach out and chuck a few questions over, don’t you think? Hello David, thanks for your time! What about a short intro? Hi, no problem thanks for asking. Well, I’m an multidisciplinary artist and designer based in Edinburgh. I work on a broad range of projects, including exhibitions, residencies, illustration commissions, animation, art direction and workshops. How would you describe your style & which narratives and themes does your work explore? I like to combine analogue and digital processes with a playful and experimental approach to composition, narrative, form and texture. Recently I’ve been exploring ideas relating to knowledge communication, specifically maps/diagrams, and our assumptions …

Visual Art Mixology: Carne Griffiths

The great thing about art is the diversity of the field, the unwillingness to stand still, but to push boundaries, progress and follow new routes. Apart from his fantastic skillset and unique approach to his subjects, Carne Griffiths clearly stands out with his technique and choice of material. It’s not merely the fact that he uses calligraphy ink, graphite, tea, vodka and brandy to create his paintings, but it’s the way he sparks an organic interaction between the matter by manipulating the drawn line that makes his work so excitingly versatile. Aesthetically his highly spiritual artworks explore the human form without boundaries, playing with symbolism, geometric and floral patterns to evoke a web of narrative patterns that feel all too familiar.           Follow Carne’s work here: http://www.carnegriffiths.com Instagram Twitter

Spot On: Kate Copeland

If you’re an attentive reader of independent as well as big name magazines and newspapers, plus follow art and illustration blogs, there’s a high chance you (deliberately or accidentally) bumped into one of Kate Copeland’s gorgeous works. As she’s one of my favourite illustrators currently out there, featuring the N/E London-based artist was pretty much a no brainer. In the last few years, she took the illustration world by storm and has quite a few heavy-hitting commissions under her belt, working for Der Spiegel, Esquire, Converse, Church of London, The Times or Sagmeister & Walsh, to name a few. Though it’s hardly surprising why clients from all sorts of industries queue up, with a style so classy and sharp, balancing on the fine line between simplicity and complexity, yet delivers punchy and imaginative portraits that bear her distinctive handwriting. If you haven’t done so already, care to remember her name. We’ll probably gonna see it out there more often. If you can’t get enough of Kate’s amazing works, these links will help you out: Website Tumblr …