All posts filed under: New

Creating ambiguous realities: Luisa Azevedo

I have to admit, it has never been easier to search and find beautiful things that spark my imagination. However sceptical we might be about it, Instagram is a real treat for those following the movers and shakers in the creative community. So this is one of my most recent sightings. Even though she doesn’t really like to consider herself an artist per se, Luisa Azevedo is a bright, young Portuguese photographer, instagrammer and collagist from Covilhã with a ton of creativity up her sleeve. Curious, playful and boasting a glaring love for the sea, she captures the sun-kissed moments she comes across on the Atlantic coast and wittily blends them into grand compositions that certainly makes you look not once but twice. Check out her work below & follow her adventures via instagram over here.                

Verónica Losantos: Screen Memories

When I grew up, my dad’s been following us with his faithful Canon AE-1 at every turn. The first smiles, the first steps, the first time sitting on Santa’s lap, mad birthday parties or my first day at school, you name it. But suddenly, things change. These important occasions become rarer, we begin to overlook the small moments and the gaps between collected memories in my parents’ photo books are getting bigger and bigger. Until there’s only blank pages left. Now, with literally everyone able to keep hold of the things we experience day in, day out with our smartphones, our lives are more documented than ever. There’s all the meaningful moments we keep safe in our hearts as well as those we would instantly forget and never revisit, if we wouldn’t have the technology at hand. But what happens if you never had the luxury of someone documenting your dearest memories with families and friends? What if there’s not a timeline from infancy to teenage years you can simply look back at? Photographer Verónica Losantos can …

Creative Findings #3: Things done differently

It’s been awhile since I’ve shared my favourite findings on the web. This time around, I’ve collected 5 lovely projects that cherish things off the beaten path. A brief look at people, who’re thinking over routines and standards and embrace new ways to inspire. Read about things done differently. Sirene Journal is an exciting new Italian magazine that seeks to explore human relationships with the sea – all beautifully printed on algae. How true to the word is that? Anyways, its founders Alberto Coretti and Floriana Cavallo had a sit-down with magazine subscription service Stack (which I can warmly recommend) to talk about their inaugural issue. Find it here. Here’s a word that couldn’t be more present in the public debate than ‘refugee’. A clever bunch of developers has now found a way to show their opinion and developed a typeface that replaces the word with the word ‘human’. It’s fittingly called Common Sans. Get it? You can download it here. There are many ways to raise awareness for one of the pressing issues of our …

The Painted Oceans Project

It’s been a little while, but here’s a new art project I really enjoyed discovering for TMRW magazine. Find the original feature here.  If you’re calling a major city like London, Paris, L.A. or New York your home, you don’t have to look very far to find an abundance of striking street art literally hidden behind every corner. Hunting down the Painted Oceans project however might take slightly more effort than tumbling over the newest mural on your doorstep. For over 5 years, graffiti and street art mastermind Tristan Eaton has been tinkering with an idea that could easily be the most ambitious art mural project the world has ever seen. Back in the day, the Red Sands Sea Forts in the Thames estuary served as the first line of defense against the Nazis in WWII until they were – not quite legally – turned into the first UK Pirate Radio stations in the 1960s and now slowly rust away as relics of a bygone time. Together with street art wizards Shepard Fairey, Futura 2000, How & …

On The Bookshelf: The Boy Who Made Faces

Probably every kid I grew up with has encountered, loved and dreaded the pretty dark and subtly evil stories by Wilhelm Busch. Does Struwwelpeter or Max and Moritz ring a bell? Well then you might see the connection here. At least for me, Marco Bevilacqua‘s little booklet The Boy Who Made Faces brilliantly catapults me back into this chapter of my childhood. Under his alias of Want Some Studio, the Edinburgh-based designer and illustrator creates artworks that fuse traditional hand crafted and digital processes, taking influences from street and pop art. The 70 page volume The Boy Who Made Faces contains 13 shrewd illustrated poems filled with heaps of black humour and reflections on the multi-media culture and shifting society we live in. Just take The Boy Who Ate Himself, The Mean Bean or Freddy and his Finger: Wilhelm Busch would’ve been proud for sure. Have a look at these fab teasers below: Check out more of Marco’s illustrations & get in touch on social media! Want Some Studio Twitter Instagram

On The Bookshelf: The Eighty-Eight Volume 2

It’s been a while since I last introduced an exciting new magazine to the blogosphere, so here’s the newest addition to my mag stand. The Eighty-Eight  proudly refers to itself as the ‘adventurous magazine for the occasional thinker’, featuring essays, stories and pictures, girdled by engaging, playful designs and illustrations. Created by curator and jazz musician Jamie Cullum, editor Anna-Marie Crowhurst and art director Kate Monument, Volume #2 is jam-packed with great and unusual stories, quirky illustrations and cheeky commentaries you won’t easily find elsewhere. What about finding the true origin of Come on Eileen, taking a dip into the dark and dirty history of flamenco or rummaging a whole mini zine dedicated to Donuts? Exactly. And because I can’t feature all of the goodies, here are my 3 fav picks from the issue! Isobel Diamond & John Hooper: Kerala by Rail Some time ago, photographer John Hooper and writer Isobel Diamond set off to travel the vastness of the Indian land & chose the most common means of transport: On one of the 11.000 trains traversing the 71.000 miles of track. This amazing …

© Matiinu Ramadhan

Creative Findings #2: Of nature myths, wanderlust, empowerment & creators

So there we are. Time for another bunch of creative gemstones I loved reading about and marvel at over the last few days. Maybe you’ll love em, too? Mighty mountain ridges have fascinated photographer Charles Emerson since his early childhood & I suppose he happily embraced the offer to travel the world and create such an impressive photo essay for Intelligent Life Magazine. The online release of ‘Myth and Mountains’ has now been launched by the good folk at Bristol’s Antlers Gallery and features breath-taking shots that literally look like impressionist paintings. Fab work! We all probably know him by the name of Walter Jr. And after his breakthrough role in cult series Breaking Bad, RJ Mitte’s career as an actor and producer has taken off big time. In the latest issue of Schön Mag, he talks about how he uses his media fame to turn his own disability into a voice of empowerment for others. Read it here via ReadBug. Oh, and no spoilers, promised! For someone like me who has worked with magazines before & tries …

Artful skeletons and peculiar closets: Recently Rejected

‘Unfinished concepts, process sketches, unpublished creative, terminated artwork, and rarely seen personal projects.’ That’s pretty much all you find on what NY-based founder Mario Hugo tenderly calls Recently Rejected, ‘a curated graveyard of both good and bad ideas’. And I’m totally on his side. There’s so many things that show up on his page that do not deserve to vanish, be destroyed or forgotten. Things that bawl for a chance to see the light of day. Let’s have a look what’s roving about, it’s quite a treasure trove! Check out these links to see more featured artworks & get in touch via social media: Website Twitter Instagram

Navigating the world through graphic abstraction: David Lemm

His eye-catching artworks have been on top of my list for a while. Experimenting with form, composition and texture to weave complex narratives, David Lemm’s graphic works explores human assumptions of truth based on abstract, symbolic representations of reality. And after collaborating with the likes of Leith Late, the Hidden Door Festival or the Bothy Project, a little bird has told me that the Edinburgh-based creative has been selected as  House of Illustration’s latest resident artist! Due time to reach out and chuck a few questions over, don’t you think? Hello David, thanks for your time! What about a short intro? Hi, no problem thanks for asking. Well, I’m an multidisciplinary artist and designer based in Edinburgh. I work on a broad range of projects, including exhibitions, residencies, illustration commissions, animation, art direction and workshops. How would you describe your style & which narratives and themes does your work explore? I like to combine analogue and digital processes with a playful and experimental approach to composition, narrative, form and texture. Recently I’ve been exploring ideas relating to knowledge communication, specifically maps/diagrams, and our assumptions …

Short Film Gem: CODA

It’s been film festival time in Edinburgh these past days so I guess treating myself to a heap of screenings made me a bit more aware of all these cinematic gems out there, waiting to be discovered. Lucky me, otherwise this beauty might’ve never popped up on my radar as I avidly browsed my Vimeo feed yesterday: CODA is an exceptional short by animation studio And Maps and Plans & director Allan Holly that has been taking home an impressive cluster of 20 international awards, including prizes at SXSW, Edinburgh Short Film Festival or Anca Festival and was among the 10 selected animated shorts at the Oscars 2015. The 9-minute piece tells the story of a lost soul who stumbles drunkenly through Dublin city. In a park, death finds him and shows him many things. It’s a beautiful film full of simple, hand-drawn imagery, a heart-wrenching plot & a moving view on the appreciation of life and the fear of death. Watch below! For more info on CODA, check these links here: andmapsandplans.com @andmapsandplans qlqn.ie …