All posts filed under: New

In Search of Perspectives: Tobias König

It’s maybe 6 years ago in a dusty skate park underneath a motorway bridge. The weather’s horrible. The rain’s pouring down and a bunch of young guns gather to seek shelter from the rain and do a few tricks. And there’s this guy clicking away with his camera, even though that was probably before Tobias König started taking stunning photos like those below – bleak and moody b/w pictures that beautifully capture his love for architecture, structures, geometric shapes as well as atmospheric portraiture. So we know each other for a while now and it seems kinda odd to do this interview, 100s of miles apart via email and in a different language. But oh well, here’s us talking briefly about his photography beginnings, spontaneity and his first public exhibitions! Hello Mr. T! Thanks for taking the time to have a chat. Well, I’m quite familiar with it, but do you mind introducing yourself briefly to everyone else out there? Hey, my name is Tobias König, a self-taught photographer. I am 25 years old and …

Visual Art Mixology: Carne Griffiths

The great thing about art is the diversity of the field, the unwillingness to stand still, but to push boundaries, progress and follow new routes. Apart from his fantastic skillset and unique approach to his subjects, Carne Griffiths clearly stands out with his technique and choice of material. It’s not merely the fact that he uses calligraphy ink, graphite, tea, vodka and brandy to create his paintings, but it’s the way he sparks an organic interaction between the matter by manipulating the drawn line that makes his work so excitingly versatile. Aesthetically his highly spiritual artworks explore the human form without boundaries, playing with symbolism, geometric and floral patterns to evoke a web of narrative patterns that feel all too familiar.           Follow Carne’s work here: http://www.carnegriffiths.com Instagram Twitter

‘Something Manly’ by Stewart Bryden

With the gender equality movement gathering support from all ends of our society, tackling misogyny and everyday sexism, it’s almost as important to turn our attention towards female roles as it is to question our general perception of men in the modern world: What’s considered manly today? Have we already pushed boundaries far enough and hurdled the last remaining features of a once patriarchal society dominated by men? The first ever stand-alone exhibition by Scottish photographer Stewart Bryden takes a similar line, exploring the visual aspects of a changing manhood, playing on the idea that there’s not only one type but a great variety blurring the borders between the masculine and powerful and the sensitive and insightful. A former assistant to NY artist and photographer Ryan McGinley and collaborating with major brands and agencies like Reiss or Dr. Martens, ‘Something Manly’ brings together a selection of his portraits and commissions, including shots of photographer David Eustace, soul singer Charles Bradley or model Chris John Millington. On that note: Tucked away in between men’s grooming essentials, …

Spot On: Kate Copeland

If you’re an attentive reader of independent as well as big name magazines and newspapers, plus follow art and illustration blogs, there’s a high chance you (deliberately or accidentally) bumped into one of Kate Copeland’s gorgeous works. As she’s one of my favourite illustrators currently out there, featuring the N/E London-based artist was pretty much a no brainer. In the last few years, she took the illustration world by storm and has quite a few heavy-hitting commissions under her belt, working for Der Spiegel, Esquire, Converse, Church of London, The Times or Sagmeister & Walsh, to name a few. Though it’s hardly surprising why clients from all sorts of industries queue up, with a style so classy and sharp, balancing on the fine line between simplicity and complexity, yet delivers punchy and imaginative portraits that bear her distinctive handwriting. If you haven’t done so already, care to remember her name. We’ll probably gonna see it out there more often. If you can’t get enough of Kate’s amazing works, these links will help you out: Website Tumblr …

On The Bookshelf: Our Time by Cat Garcia

‘The underpinnings of genius are always invisible: no matter how hard you look, you can never see the strings.’ This sentence instantly caught my eye when I flicked through the intro of ‘Our Time’ and is probably one of the most canny and truthful statements about perceiving and valuing creativity I’ve read in a long time. London-based photographer Cat Garcia released this heavy bible of creative inspiration already a year ago and after vanishing entirely from my mind, I couldn’t be happier that my better half remembered and caught me unaware with it for my last birthday! And even though I’ve only finished reading through maybe 50% of its content, it’s due time to feature this beautiful thing on my bookshelf. For ‘Our Time’, Garcia set out to portray Britain’s 60 most creative people over the course of one year, following them into their homes and studios, observing their daily work routine, the process of designing and crafting, then again encountering and carving out the human being itself, detached from the artist’s persona. Printed on tactile, uncoated paper, her wonderful, classy and predominantly b/w photographs …

Travelling the Globe one Postcard at a Time: Q&A with Gizem Kuzu

I just can’t get enough of creative people and their clever ideas. Another small, cute and thoughtful project I wanted to make a dash at is ‘Postcards Beyond’ by Turkish art student Gizem Kuzu, which is none other than a lifetime venture in the making. To some extend, her project reminded me a bit of this guy, who plans to meet each and every of his 1000+ virtual facebook friends for a coffee and have a proper conversation in real life. Other than getting in touch with people she (somehow) knows through social networks, Gizem’s idea is to send a postcard to at least every region in the world, build relationships the old-fashioned way by reminding people how special it is to get something physical from someone you’ve never met before: ‘We’re living in an age of technology and that’s great but what are we going to give our grandkids? My father gave me his stamp collection and wanted me to continue and I’ve turned this to something else.’ But before I bubble over with …

Sweeney's Bothy #1 © The Bothy Project

The Artist and the Solitude: The Bothy Project

‘I am not an artist, but can I just live here, please?’ That was probably my first disbelieving thought, when I saw the beautiful images of these remote huts scattered around a pristine landscape. You could easily sneak them into collections of architecture appreciators like #cabinporn without revealing their true purpose – besides looking outrageously cosy. The Bothy Project, initiated by artist Bobby Niven and architect Iain MacLeod in 2011, is a network of intimate, small-scale and off-grid art residency spaces in distinct locations around Scotland and beyond. While offering a platform for artists from various disciplines and practices to journey and explore the peculiarities of the history, mythology, landscape and people in the areas surrounding the bothies, the team behind TBP is committed to use only sustainable, innovative materials to create simple, modern designs. So far, there’s three lovely bothies to marvel at: Inshriach Bothy was built as a part of RSA Residencies for Scotland and fabricated in residence at the Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop in 2011, before getting nestled in a sparse hilltop wood …

On The Bookshelf: ‘Photographer Writer Illustrator’ by Miniclick

I love magazines. And photography. And especially if both are refreshing and doing things slightly different than the average publication. So when I first read about ‘Photographer Writer Illustrator’, with a broad smirk on my face, I had to think back to my early childhood and a playful writing, saying or drawing game we called ‘Stille Post’ or ‘Chinese whispers’. Like in the early surrealist tradition of ‘cadavre exquis’, each kid added something to the composition by scribbling or painting something on paper, allowed to see only what the previous person has come up with.   Back in the here and now, yet with the same childish delight and curiosity I eagerly awaited, unwrapped and came to love that small delivery Miniclick recently sent up North. Formed in Brighton around 2010, the lovely photography collective has made its mark with free talks, discussions, workshops and exhibitions in a growing but still tangible local scene of like-minded people in recent years. And of course the creative team around founder Jim Stephenson yet got another ace up their sleeves: …

© Julien Coquentin

‘Black Seasons’ by Julien Coquentin

Sometimes it just happens without knowing and I find myself dwelling around a website longer than I would care for. Facebook, twitter, pinterest or vimeo. Oh, and let’s not forget adobe’s artistic brainchild behance. The nosy creative connoisseur inside me simply loves to browse the hell out of it. Just hit ‘Most Appreciated’, pick a creative category of your choice and you’ll probably get your mind blown pretty quickly. Sometimes I happen to find a heap of really outstanding projects in a matter of minutes that way, another day it’s only one or two decent ones in half an hour of skimming through a seemingly never ending list of visual overload. Anyhow, last night I made a strike. After just about 4 swift minutes and sifting through maybe 15 other (similarly promising) projects, my cursor bumped into Julien Coquentin’s intriguing work. To be honest, the fifth and most recent chapter of his ‘Black Seasons’ series tops off probably one of the most atmospheric photographic showcases I’ve seen for quite a while. Moving along snowy roads, …

© Tim Lane

Drawing a Narrative: In Conversation with Tim Lane

A web of eclectic visual storytelling, knitting threads of mythology and classic literary tales, delving into the abyss of the human psyche with a surrealist verve that raises far more questions than it answers. Simply put, Tim Lane’s impressive portfolio effortlessly ticks all the boxes for me. He first caught my attention when nomadic Antlers Gallery – the lovely Bristolians who represent Tim – set out for collaborative exhibition ‘Kindred’ with London’s emerging Curious Duke Gallery in 2013. Since then, the Cheltenham-born illustrator and painter released his highly ambitious, crowd-funded mammoth project ‘Anima Mundi – Soul of the World’, a 5-metre concertina book of graphite drawings that took two whole years to complete. Similar to his earlier works, his large-scale visceral illustration plays with recurring themes such as love and death, renewal and sexuality as well as the animalization of the human being, which yet unfolds an enigmatic open-ended narrative. And when I got the chance for a short Q&A with Tim, I eagerly jumped at it and asked him about his all-time favorite authors, the …