All posts tagged: Kickstarter

Say Hello to Boom Saloon

Having freelanced quite a bit in the wonderful magic world of indie magazines, keeping ad-free photography and adventure magazine Wildland Mag afloat, I was genuinely excited when I was let in on a new project idea. About a year ago, I met (then) twitter acquaintance Rachel Arthur for a chat and it felt like two magazine minds instantly clicked. We talked about the way media, journalism and the publishing industry shifted in the past years, old powerhouses falling by the wayside and how indie magazines have taken over bigger and bigger chunks of traditional readerships with exciting new content and financing models. And so we spoke about boom saloon, a new adventure she was scheming with friend and designer Jamie Smail.  At its core sits a beautifully printed magazine full of inspiring stories by a collective of international contributors, seeking to spur a movement, a wave to democratise creativity for good. As part of every issue, boom saloon selects a social project to support and champion creativity in underprivileged areas. It’s about taking young creatives by the hand, nurturing their raw talent …

Silent Quarter by Tim Lane

Back when I spoke to him last year, Bristol-based illustrator Tim Lane already hinted at getting his hands on an ambitious new challenge that draws on his colossal art book project ‘Anima Mundi’. And he certainly did not laze about for long and hurled himself into a wonderfully dark short story project called Silent Quarter. Featuring a combination of writing and drawing, the fragmented narrative unfolds as a spiritual journey through the mind of an old mask-maker and barber as he comes to the end of his long life of love, service, ceremony and creativity. With its open and playful structure – think of beautiful fold-out artworks augmenting the text vignettes – Silent Quarter winds along different threads and leaves the reader with various forms of interpretation, as they’re exploring a world of reality and delusion: “From the magic of creativity and the powerful transformative effects of: masks, haircuts and thunderstorms – to the intense personal experience of: loss, the endurance of love and the importance of memory. It ranges from a seemingly solid sense of a community, a family, an ancestry …

A Thousand Dawns – Cycling the Earth by Bike

Here’s a short adventure feature I did for TMRW the other day & because it’s such a fab project, I had to just share it over here, too. Enjoy the ride and help make it happen! I don’t know about you, but there’s something that never gets old about Kickstarter projects. It’s the heart and soul it takes to bring an exciting idea to life with the help of others. And there’s countless causes I’d love to throw my money at just because they’re so darn clever. Rob Lutter’s ‘A Thousand Dawns’ is one of those inspiring endeavours I’d love to see bearing fruit. “In London, before this all began, I had lost my way. But, a journey that began as escape grew into a meaningful, emotional project based around creativity and charity. My dream ever since has been to share the story and the photography with others around the world: those in search of adventure or change or those who just love to dream and wonder, explore and ride free.” After a tremendous adventure …

Cover © Maud Chalard

On The Bookshelf: The Quarterly Magazine Issue #2

Inevitably, you stumble across them, whether covering a whole page or squeezed into its very last corner. For many of us, adverts are inseparably entangled with our favourite magazines. Don’t get me wrong here. I’m not only an admirer of the written word, exciting stories and compelling photography, but equally digging clever adverts. It’s just about keeping a balance. Well, if I’m flicking through the pages of most lifestyle, fashion or culture-related mags, all you basically do is jumping from one random perfume, clothing or technology ad to another. The actual articles quite often wither into mere fill-in amongst the crowd. To me, something’s wrong here. Annoyingly wrong. People (supposedly) buy magazines for content in the first place, right? At least I do. So where’s the value and appreciation for the creatives behind it – writers, editors and photographers – if the focus is constantly distracted from the real deal? The photographic print journal The Quarterly however proves that things can be done quite differently, devoted to an ethical, art-valuing and ad-free concept. Well, let’s step back and get to the bottom of it. …