All posts tagged: Photography

© Ben Battaglia

Analog.days: Ben Battaglia

Sometimes I wonder about limits. The limits of exposure – not strictly photographically speaking, but rather the number of images the human eye can spot, process and assess. What are our precast or learned definition of what’s worth a second look and what isn’t? When it comes to film photography, one thing’s for sure: I have a soft spot for bright, bold, unusual compositions. And if you throw some interesting perspectives, multiple exposures and an interesting choice of film stock – I’m looking at you, Lomochrome Purple! – into the mix, we’ve got a match. Ben Battaglia‘s photos were pretty much calling out Bingo! in that respect, so it was only fair to enlist the compadre from the Southern English seaside town of Bournemouth for a little Q&A. Here we go! Let’s get the obvious one out the way: How and when did you figure out that shooting on film was for you? I was initially introduced to shooting film while studying for my photography A-level in 2009. The course focused on darkroom and we were required …

SelfieOnFilm

The selfie. Once considered as the artist’s go-to tool for self-presentation. Nowadays though, it’s more of an epitome of the disposable and (to some) an ailment of our digital world. Shot in every variation imaginable, played to the gallery, until somewhat happy with the result(s), selfies not only clutter our smartphone camera rolls, but rules supreme over today’s social media and photo apps. On Instagram, some 367m photos, and counting, are tagged with #selfie and there are no signs of slowing down. Infinite tries are not necessarily an option if you’re shooting film and so SelfieOnFilm features those who do it the old fashioned way and tell a story or two about the snap along the way. It is driven by what I like most about film photography: Not about the perfect shot, but about character, the little flaws, the grainy bits and distortions that make these images worthwhile and timeless.            

Laura Pannack: Separation

Brexit’s a tough topic, a sore spot, especially if you’re experiencing it in the midst of it all, have family and friends who are or will be affected by the aftermath that nobody fully understands, least the country’s politicians. A lot, maybe too much has been said, written, lied, complained and argued about it, yet it’s an issue that’s in a way affecting everyone in Europe. And may it only tell us about the state the European project is in and how people perceive it, struggle with it, give up on it. Having lived in the UK before and after the horrendous decision as an expat myself before moving back to home soil, I know of the lingering questions that have put many relationships to the test. Shall we stay or do we have to leave? Does anyone still want us here? Should we get married to be on the safe side? In her intimate portrait series ‘Separation’, commissioned by British Journal of Photography, photographer Laura Pannack explores these feelings of uncertainty between London-based couples …

Lost in the moody hues: Maya Beano

I always have a knack for brilliant analog photography, but the level of atmosphere in Maya Beano’s moody images is off the charts. If there is ever a perfect moment, the perfect weather conditions, the perfect interplay of light and shadows, she’s right there and well knows how to use and command the elements. Whether it is playing around with haunting double exposures, long exposures, different filters of beautiful monochrome, purple, violet or turquoise colour hues or shooting on simple 35mm film format, there’s always something awe-inspiring to discover in her compositions. Of course, Maya’s skill didn’t go unnoticed over the years: Her stunning work has raised eyebrows at The Independent Photographer, has been featured in #PHOTOGRAPHY magazine, selected for a fantastic Oh Comely cover or listed as part of the If You Leave Showcases 2015 and 2016. And deservedly so. Check out more of her work here on her website and social media feed: mayabeano.com @instagram @tumblr

Green Day © Rolling Spoke / Gus Kovac

Peddling through life on two wheels: Rolling Spoke

I have to admit, I’m a sucker for a city like Amsterdam. Liberal, friendly, charming, lots of flowing water, a good music scene and people treat cyclists well, see them as given parts of traffic on the streets. No wonder Gus moved there. He is a tireless observer of the city and its inhabitants on two pedals and two wheels with all its little facets. Time for a chat with the man, who runs urban bicycle lifestyle blog Rolling Spoke. Hi Gus. Hoe gaat het? Please introduce yourself. My name is Gus Kovac. I’m a Canadian from Toronto and I’ve been living in Amsterdam for just over 3 years now along with my wife, 2 month old daughter and our cat. I run a blog called the Rolling Spoke derived from the simple pleasure of riding a bike in the city.It began as a creative outlet with the intent to present an unbridled view of urban life on two wheels. I aim to bring a different spin on things by infusing my passion for street …

Denitsa Toshirova about Cold Memories

Often enough, this is how it goes with social media nowadays: Even though you live in the same big city and you’ve got a shared appreciation for the other’s work, doesn’t mean you’ve ever met outside of the online sphere. Denitsa Toshirova is a very talented young photographer from Bulgaria and I’ve been following her impressive portfolio for a good while now. Seriously, check out her work here, it’s fantastic. I happened to met her in person for the first time at the launch night of Boom Saloon, when we found out we’re actually magazine buddies – my piece on Jupiter Artland and Denitsa’s stunning photo series ‘Cold Memories’ side-by-side. All the more reason to sit down with her and briefly catch up on her beginnings, inspirations, identity and, well, that wretched thing called Brexit. Hi Denitsa, let’s get right into it: How would you describe your photographic style and which themes do you predominantly explore in your work? I would like to think my photographic style is always developing and I feel over the last few years …

Cover © Fabienne Rivory

Croisées by Fabienne Rivory

Creating something excitingly new often means questioning common perceptions, mindsets and practices. For her long-time project ‘Labokoff’, French artist Fabienne Rivory explores the interactions between photography and painting, the interface of the real and the imagined. Just recently, she released a new, vibrant set of works – a series called ‘Croisées’ that’s as dreamy and poetic as her earlier creations: Beautifully mirrored reflections of eerie landscapes shot in b/w-tones are brought to life with bright watercolours, ink and gouache. A fusion made in heaven, as it seems. labokoff.com @twitter @facebook