All posts filed under: Art

Illustrated film goodness: Delve Weekly

One of my favourite mags and absolute movie-go-to source undisputedly is Little White Lies. Well-informed writing, fabulous reviews, sleek design and each issue accompanied by a beautifully illustrated cover for the next exciting, upcoming film release. If only they’d release an issue more often than just every two months. Maybe I’m just being greedy here, but in the meantime, a cool newsletter service luckily dropped in my lap that comes in with a fresh idea to celebrate film week-by-week. Probably still flying a bit under the radar of many, Delve Weekly is the brainchild of London-based creative agency Human After All (who co-founded Little White Lies, btw) and recommends one new film that’s most worth watching at the cinema, bite-sized to our inboxes every Friday. And aside from a well-rounded review by the likes of Peter Bradshaw or Karen Krizanovich and a bunch of intriguing links that compliment the weekly feature, delve also offers a pretty tasty treat for design lovers like me: Alternative poster designs. Once the panel of critics decides on a feature they deem unmissable, the studio bucks up and tracks down just the …

Spot On: Chris Delorenzo

Sometimes it doesn’t take more than a few simple line drawings, striking patterns and elaborate geometry to create something incredibly expressive and graphic designer Chris Delorenzo certainly has the artworks to prove it. Playful, witty and fueled by his love for literature, poetry and cinema, his practice is all about crafting a visual narrative that invites the observer into a different reality or questions the very one we live in. Once an art director for Saatchi & Saatchi in NYC, the Massachusetts-native works as an in-house design weapon for clothing brand ‘Johnny Cupcakes’, juggles with brand design, logo, typography and editorial work and yet finds time to chase some pretty cool personal projects. If anything, check out the Be Brave Podcast he co-produces, which features interviews with young people who made a name for themselves in the creative industries and has Chris’ quirky style written all over it. Oh and have a look at his ongoing ‘Nude with phone’-series, which is, well, pretty hot right now. @Instagram @Twitter @Dribbble

Haunting monoliths of magnetic tape | The “V”HS Project

Over the years, the hunger for new technology has relentlessly thwarted one or another beloved everyday gadget we couldn’t imagine living without. While vinyl records made a miraculous return to strength, things that once reigned our living room shelves for a heartfelt eternity – music cassettes, polaroid films, Super-8 or VHS tapes – were reduced to mere nostalgia by the hands of their successors.  Meanwhile the French mixed-media artist Philip Ob Rey has dusted off the good old magnetic tapes in style to turn his fantastic “V”HS project into a piece of social and environmental critique. His dark and brooding monoliths, created in collaboration with painter Louie Otesanek and photographer Mailie Viney, walk the frozen Icelandic vastness, clad in old VHS film-rolls, stones, feathers, shells or dry seaweeds with one single purpose: Questioning the global tech craze, the overconsumption of new technologies and consequently the unstoppable plastic pollution of the Earth. With the use of a doomed technology that humanity has inevitably forgotten, Ob Rey wants to remind humanity of the mortality of its existence, …

The Monsters By My Side: Lucas Beaufort

If you’re into surfing, snowboarding or skateboarding, you might’ve come across one or two of Lucas Beaufort’s rad artworks. Be it for magazine covers, photo series, ads or even whole board graphic series, the French illustrator and painter bursts in on the scene with his acrylic drawings of edgy, colourful monster characters. And as they’re peering out of a window, lurking in a sewer tunnel, drinking beers, having fun and cheering the riders on, he gives the rough, jaw-dropping shots a twist of humour and weirdness that surely leaves you with a big fat grin on your face. While the artist draws inspiration from his dreams and particularly his nightmares, not every stunning photo he finds fits his painting makeovers. It’s not so much the action or the trick that he looks for, but all the elements that make up a great piece of photography. So before he experiments with the canvas and lets them creep right into the open, Lucas makes sure his monster brigades have enough space to hang out and support the cover boy/girl in their own, adorable way. Astonishingly, …

The Painted Oceans Project

It’s been a little while, but here’s a new art project I really enjoyed discovering for TMRW magazine. Find the original feature here.  If you’re calling a major city like London, Paris, L.A. or New York your home, you don’t have to look very far to find an abundance of striking street art literally hidden behind every corner. Hunting down the Painted Oceans project however might take slightly more effort than tumbling over the newest mural on your doorstep. For over 5 years, graffiti and street art mastermind Tristan Eaton has been tinkering with an idea that could easily be the most ambitious art mural project the world has ever seen. Back in the day, the Red Sands Sea Forts in the Thames estuary served as the first line of defense against the Nazis in WWII until they were – not quite legally – turned into the first UK Pirate Radio stations in the 1960s and now slowly rust away as relics of a bygone time. Together with street art wizards Shepard Fairey, Futura 2000, How & …

On The Bookshelf: Made For Skate

Rowley XLT, Koston 4, TNT, Chief, Reynolds 3, DVS CT, the list goes on and on. Well, what probably sounds like a lot of gibberish to some is only a small fraction of the compadres that kept my feet safe day in day out on my trips down the city streets and to the local park, joined me jumping down stairs and handrails or enduring pool and miniramp sessions since I started skateboarding back in ‘01. It’s hard to describe why I still remember this so vividly, but let’s put it this way: My weapons of choice – the piles of broken wood and the mass of shredded footwear – had as much of a story to tell as it might’ve been this soft toy from your early childhood, the first football jersey that made its way under the Christmas tree or even the first band shirt you bought ages ago. There is an emotional value, a form of identification and dissociation that so often goes without saying. ‘The worn down soles, the frazzled laces. You made …

Artist Conversations: Q&A with Mark Boardman

I love geometry, colour, depth and simplicity when it comes to illustrations – have a look at these or these. Yet simple textural designs, storytelling & dense atmospheres don’t always go hand in hand. My newest interview partner got all bases covered, though. Mark Boardman is a Bristol-based illustrator who divides his work between editorial and advertising commissions as well as his many exciting freelance projects. I dropped him a line and had a chat about the perks of working with various media, the influence of literature, scouting locations on google.maps and yeah, heavy metal. Hi Mark! What have you been up to lately? At the moment I’m working on a lot of new portfolio pieces. I’m trying to push myself technically while putting together a collection of work that’s attractive to prospective clients. Often if I’m left to my own devices I’ll end up producing illustrations that don’t have a great deal of commercial value so it’s good for me to refocus on commercial subject matter every now and again. You were shifting from traditional oil painting …

Spot On | The mystical world of Daehyun Kim

We always want to explain everything. Find an answer to the question. Find a reason for doing something this way or that way. Even vindicate why we adore or reject something. Sometimes, you see things that are just so breathtaking, there’s not much you have to explain. A simple ‘W O W’. That was pretty much what my brain was able to piece together at the mere sight of Daehyun Kim’s deeply mysterious, captivating and yet so simple Moonassi-series. Taking influence from his own studies in traditional East-Asian art and painting, the Seoul-born illustrator creates intricate ink drawings of characters symbolising ideas and aspects of daily life, relationships and the search for identity in an incessantly philosophical manner: ‘I wanted to draw something I really know and something I really can speak about. It was my inner feelings and my intimate relations that give me various emotions. What I like to create is a drawing as an empty space between me and the viewer, so that people can talk and find their own story from my drawings.’ …

Shaping Mountain Silhouettes | Katy Ann Gilmore

If I’m honest, Christmas has been a wonderful time of repose, contemplation and, of course, overindulgence, but that doesn’t mean I’ve been all lazy, smug and reluctant to spend some time off browsing, searching and discovering exciting new talent now and then. So one of the names that’s scribbled on the top of my list is Katy Ann Gilmore’s and you’re about to find out why she’s the real deal: For her eye-catching drawings, large-scale murals and installations, the L.A.-based visual artist takes inspiration from nature and topography and seeks to further explore the relationship between 2D, perpendicular planes and their distortions into 3D space. Usually armed with her army of acrylic markers and a steady hand, Gilmore meticulously works the canvas, adding pen stroke after pen stroke in a staccato fashion that eventually weaves into biomorphic silhouettes of the hilly landscapes and monumental mountain ranges waiting on her very doorstep. Have a look, it’s a real treat!                   Check out more of her artworks & get in touch via social media. …

Mapping the Self: Patrice Barnabé

Whilst the art of self-portraiture, irrespective of creative discipline, has been often perceived as the magical door leading to the artist’s soul, it captures only a limited segment of a person’s life with all its emotions, experiences and mysteries. Patrice Barnabé is a London-based French Rioplatense graphic designer, who tries to approach the task from a slightly different perspective. With his elaborate use of typography, illustration and mapping, he tries to challenge and redefine the traditional format of the self-portrait on an extensive scale: ‘Geography and maps gather a lot of information and identity in a very condensed infographic. By picturing myself as an island, I managed to tell a lot about myself, show my favourite places on earth —some imaginary as well— and have some fun doing it.’ Find more of Patrice’s artworks & say Hi on social media: Patrice Barnabé @Twitter